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NYC Mayor Bill De Blasio holds up a reusable water bottle as an example of a change he made for the environment.

 

The Mayor’s Zero Waste by 2030 initiative. It’s a key part of NYC’s OneNYC comprehensive long-term sustainability plan. Getting to Zero Waste in NYC will help us maximize our resources, lighten our carbon footprint, enhance economic resilience, and lead us to new consumption and disposal habits.

Get involved!  Start by taking the Zero Waste Pledge HERE.

Bins for recycling organic waste will continue to roll out to NYC neighborhoods as part of the Mayor's Zero Waste plan over the next several years.

Bins for recycling organic waste will continue to roll out to NYC neighborhoods as part of the Mayor’s Zero Waste plan over the next several years (Image: Uli Seit).

NYC Organics Program

DSNY’s Collection Program for food scraps, yard waste, and soiled paper serves ten percent of NYC households with plans to expand to more neighborhoods. Residences with fewer than 10 units in pre-determined areas automatically receive this service at apartments, businesses, and schools. Residences with 10+ units can enroll online.

The re-fashioNYC program helps New Yorkers get to zero waste by recycling the nearly 200,000 tons of textiles and apparel NYC throws away annually.

The re-fashioNYC program helps New Yorkers get to zero waste by recycling the nearly 200,000 tons of textiles and apparel NYC throws away annually (Image: DSNY).

Re-fashioNYC

Partnership between the NYC Department of Sanitation (DSNY) and Housing Works (www.housingworks.org) that makes clothing and textile donations easy through an in-building drop-off service. Free donation bins are available for buildings with 10+ units. Residents can enroll online.

e-CycleNYC

NYC’s residential recycling service for electronic waste. As of January 2015, it is illegal to put TVs, computers, and other electronic waste in the trash. Apartment buildings with 10+ units can arrange for free secure storage and pickup by Electronic Recyclers International (ERI).

GrowNYC

Runs NYC’s greenmarkets and community gardens, collects foodscraps, clothing and textiles. Hosts Stop ‘N’ Swap community reuse events where you can bring and/or take gently used items — all for free.  Provides recycling outreach for apartment residents and teaches kids to garden.

Supplies found at Materials for the Arts were creatively reused for the “20,000 Screams Under the Sea” Halloween performance (Image: Materials for the Hearts)

Supplies found at Materials for the Arts were creatively reused for the “20,000 Screams Under the Sea” Halloween performance (Image: Materials for the Hearts)

Materials for the Arts

Creative reuse initiative operated by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs. Collects supplies donated by businesses and individuals, and makes them available for free to nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and public schools for arts programs. Learn more about MFTA’s creative reuse HERE.

DonateNYC

Formerly known as ReuseNYC, allows residents to locate local thriftshops and other reuse organizations where they can donate and find used goods. Download the donateNYC app. Also, helps businesses and nonprofits donate unneeded office supplies, commercial equipment, and construction materials by connecting them to recipients.

Information Table at NYC Compost Project hosted by Earth Matter.

Information table at NYC Compost Project hosted by Earth Matter (Image: DSNY).

NYC Compost Project

Gives New Yorkers the knowledge, skills, and opportunities they need to produce and use compost. It is funded by DSNY and hosted by seven nonprofit botanical gardens and ecology centers who run small scale compost sites that process organics, and hold workshops and certification programs.

GreeNYC

Take the B.Y.O. Pledge to bring your own bottles, mugs and shopping bags. Also, check out some useful green living tips.

Lower East Side Ecology Center

Runs an electronic waste recycling and reuse program. Sponsors neighborhood e-waste collection events and operates a reuse center in Gowanus, Brooklyn that sells gently used electronics. It is also one of seven organizations that compose the NYC Compost Project.

Pop Up Repair brings NYC closer to zero waste by fixing chairs, lamps, appliances, jewelry, clothing and other household items.

Pop Up Repair brings NYC closer to zero waste by fixing chairs, lamps, appliances, jewelry, clothing and other household items (Image: Pop Up Repair).

Fixers Collective

Offers monthly open-to-the-public repair sessions in Brooklyn and Manhattan for items ranging from jewelry to electronic devices.

Pop-up Repair

Runs short term repair shops for common household items on the Upper West Side. Email fixit[@]popuprepair.com to learn where they will be popping up next.

Wearable Collections

Shoes are among the many clothing items collected by Wearable Collections. (Image: Adam Baruchowitz)

Shoes are among the many clothing items collected by Wearable Collections. (Image: Adam Baruchowitz)

A for-profit textile recycler that provides drop-off points for unwanted clothing in apartment buildings and in 31 NYC greenmarkets. Can partner with schools and nonprofits to host a clothing or sneaker drive, where it donates a portion of the event’s revenue. Founder Adam Baruchowitz shares his story HERE.

Upper West Side Recycling Newsletter

Bimonthly email newsletter with information about environmental activities, organizations and publications. Subscribers can download free PDF of places that accept hard to recycle items. Contact Jeff Twine at jtwine[@]synerjy.com to subscribe.

Manhattan SWAB Community Composting Grants

Manhattan Solid Waste Advisory Board (SWAB) provides funding assistance for community, small-scale organic waste diversion initiatives across the city. Since its inception in 2011 the program has granted over $91,457 to 146 groups to undertake composting projects in their neighborhoods in all five boroughs. 2017 Grant applications close March 24, 2017.

NYC’s “How to Get Rid of. . .” Page

The easiest way to learn how to get rid of unwanted items. Simply type your item into the search bar to get a description of available recycling and disposal methods, including merchant take-back programs.

1% of the New York City waste stream is electronics.

1% of the New York City waste stream is electronics (Image: Associated Press)

Electronics Recycling Locations

A listing of retailers and other locations in NYC where you can recycle electronic waste that cannot be disposed of or recycled via e-cycle.

SAFE Disposal

NYC's blue bin recyclables are processed at the State-of-the-Art Material Recovery Facility in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.

NYC’s blue bin recyclables are processed at the State-of-the-Art Material Recovery Facility in Sunset Park, Brooklyn (Image: Sims Municipal).

There is one special waste (solvents, automotive materials, flammables and electronics) drop-off site in each borough that operates every Saturday and the last Friday of each month. There are also 10 SAFE Disposal events held every year for residents to bring and dispose of harmful household products.

Sims Municipal Recycling Facility, Sunset Park, Brooklyn

All ‘blue’ bin recyclables are sent to Sims for sorting and then on to various manufacturers to be made into new products. Learn more and schedule a tour.

Pratt Industries, Staten Island

All ‘green’ bin recyclables are sent to this plant for recycling into new corrugated boxes and other products right here in NYC. Learn more.

Dear Fellow New Yorkers,

We hope you find this guide a useful tool in your our quest towards Zero Waste. Initially created as a hand-out to participants at our WasteLess, LiveBetter Workshops, we are now offering it as a public service to all New Yorkers.

Jacquie Ottman poses with GreeNYC's Birdie advocate for the BYO movement

Jacquie Ottman poses with GreeNYC’s Birdie advocate for the BYO movement

WeHateToWaste.com is an initiative of J. Ottman Consulting, Inc., our New York City-based marketing consultancy with the mission of changing consumption culture through the prism of zero waste.WeHateToWaste.com is a curated space where passionate people from around the world can share inspiring stories and practical tips for reducing waste. This content informs our insights about how we can get to zero waste in NYC. 

We want to share these insights with you. Contact us to learn about how we can provide you with advice, give our inspirational WasteLess, LiveBetter talks to your business, not for profits, and other groups. Learn more.

To subscribe to our free newsletter and learn about upcoming public workshops and events, link here.

We wish you the best in your efforts to align with NYC’s Zero by 2030 initiative, and look forward to helping you address your challenges and hearing about your successes.

We Hate to Waste

We Hate to Waste

We Hate to Waste

Jacquie Ottman

The We Hate to Waste Team

Thanks to Sam Rosecan, Kathleen Emerson, Theo Stewart-Stand and Cait Harrington-Smith for their help creating this page.

OTHER RESOURCES THAT WILL BE SURE TO INSPIRE AND HELP YOU:

RethinkWasteProject,  Deschutes County, Oregon

NYC Recycling Decals for Residential Buildings